“Loving Our Neighbor” is the founding principle for the work of the David Weekley Family Foundation.

“‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and greatest commandment and the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’” (Matthew 22:37, 39)
— Matthew 22:37-39

The Great Commandment puts us in a place of constant humility and gratitude. It offers us meaning and purpose through relationship and it offers us love through grace rather than through performance.


LOVING OUR NEIGHBOR MEANS WE SERVE OTHERS FIRST

We recognize that every person bears the image of God. We each have dignity and value; we each are broken and in need of God’s grace; in our shared humanity we strive to seek the flourishing of others. Serving others means a posture of active generosity.

LOVING OUR NEIGHBOR MEANS WE ACT AS STEWARDS

We define stewardship as maximizing the value of assets to achieve the purposes of the owner. God is the owner of all that we have and we are the stewards.

True stewardship is always a tangible expression of love in action. If loving our neighbor is merely a feeling, then it can be passive. But loving our neighbor well means taking decisive action in a difficult world. This includes insisting on excellence, making the right call when faced with a difficult decision, ensuring accountability, taking risk, competing hard, and speaking the truth.

True stewardship involves maximizing all kinds of assets and capital -- not only financial, but also social, spiritual, influence, and others. We insist on performance and excellence, not only so that we can succeed but so that many people can succeed.

True stewardship insists on a results orientation and a culture of measurement. These tools are often misused to create an environment of fear, but when properly used, they encourage people to be good stewards as they strive for high levels of efficiency and impact in order to better serve others.

In our philanthropy, we are careful to avoid creating or perpetuating dependency, as this fails the tests of serving people and acting as stewards. Therefore we limit our philanthropic involvement within boundaries that allow charitable organizations to become stronger and more effective.

LOVING OUR NEIGHBOR MEANS WE DO THE RIGHT THING

Doing the right thing means more than simply reacting with integrity in times of crisis. It means doing right thing when the cost is high, when the test is small, and when no one is looking. It means taking proactive action on behalf of others that can benefit them in the short and long term.

If we honor our commitment to serve others first, we’re more likely to do the right thing, because often “the wrong thing” is better for us personally.

If we honor our commitment to act as stewards, we’re more likely to find the generative solution that maximizes benefit for all parties, rather than the zero-sum solution that pits our interests against others. We’re more inclined to take a long-term rather than a short-term view.

Few things expose our heart for others as doing the right thing. Knowing the right thing to do means having wisdom or moral discernment.

LOVING OUR NEIGHBOR MEANS WE CARE FOR THE LEAST OF THESE

As we believe that free market capitalism is the most just and prosperous economic arrangement in a broken world, we believe the primary responsibility for “caring for the least of these” lies with individuals and voluntary organizations, and not with the government.

Therefore, as grateful and blessed individuals committed to loving our neighbor sacrificially as God commands, we joyfully seek to do so with generosity, excellence, and scale. DWH and DWFF each play a significant and complementary role in our strategy to care for the least of these.


Accepting the Great Commandment means signing on to an ambitious purpose to live for others; it also means acknowledging that the power to do so comes from God.